News Release | Environment New York Research and Policy Center

Report: Tyson #1 Water Polluter Among Corporate Agribusinesses

Tyson Foods, one of the world’s largest meat and poultry producers, dumps more toxic pollution into the nation’s waters than any other agribusiness, and produces the most animal manure of five major companies assessed nationwide, a new report said today.

The Environment New York Research & Policy Center study documented pollution from Tyson and four other major agriculture conglomerates, responsible for an estimated 44 percent of the pork, chicken, and beef produced in the U.S.

“When most people think of water pollution, they think of industrial pipes spewing toxic chemicals,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York. “But this report shows how, increasingly, corporations like Tyson are turning farms into factories and ruining our rivers and bays in the process.”

News Release | Environment New York

Broad Coalition Calls on Governor Cuomo to Launch Offshore Wind Power for New York

Today, a letter from over 60 groups representing hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers was sent to Governor Cuomo, calling for bold action to start a new energy chapter for the Empire State. With a massive offshore wind resource available right off our shores, representatives of environmental, public health, labor, environmental justice, and community organizations are pushing for a large-scale, long-term, megawatt-certain offshore wind power commitment from the Governor.

A large-scale commitment to offshore wind power will be needed to ensure New York meets Governor Cuomo’s goal of producing 50% of the state’s electricity from renewable sources by 2030 and launches a new industry capable of unleashing the many benefits responsibly-developed offshore wind power will bring to New York. Groups are specifically calling on the Cuomo Administration to include an offshore wind tier in the soon-to-be finalized Clean Energy Standard, in order to ensure the market certainty needed to launch a robust offshore wind industry in New York.

News Release | Environment New York Research and Policy Center

Environment New York Kicks off public education effort for 100 percent clean, renewable energy

Environment New York Research & Policy Center will deploy over a thousand door-knockers this summer in a multi-million-dollar effort to educate New Yorkers about the possibility of 100 percent clean, renewable energy.

Part of a nationwide campaign to reach more than 1.3 million Americans, canvassers from offices in New York City will distribute literature to more than 86,000 New York households, showing that the country has both the tools and the imperative to transition entirely off dirty fuels to clean sources such as wind and solar. “To have healthier and more economically vibrant communities right now, and a livable future for our kids, we need to transform the way we produce and consume energy,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York, “The good news we’re spreading is that 100 percent renewable is 100 percent possible.”

News Release | Environment New York

Report: Transportation Without Carbon Pollution is Necessary and Achievable

From electric vehicles, to carsharing, to smartphone apps to plan travel, a variety of new tools can help make transportation systems in our cities carbon-free, a new reportsaid today. “Every day the news about global warming's impacts gets worse, but the news about technological advances in clean transportation gets better," said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York. “We can and we must chart a new way forward for a transportation future that will protect our kids’ health and the planet.”

News Release | Environment New York

Bad Ozone Bill Passed

Despite the opposition of Rep. Nydia Velázquez (D-New York), today the U.S. House of Representatives voted to adopt H.R. 4775, sponsored by Rep. Pete Olson (R-Texas). Dubbed the “Smoggy Skies Act,” the measure would permanently weaken the Clean Air Act, block updated ozone pollution limits for years, and impose sweeping changes to future standards for smog-forming ozone and five other major air pollutants.

Pages