Report | Environment New York

Solar Hot Water Heating Could Cut NY’s Global Warming Pollution Equal to Taking 614,000 Cars Off the Road

New York could reduce pollution and dependence on fossil fuels through the deployment of off the shelf, cost-effective solar hot water technology, according to a new report by Environment New York.

Report | Environment New York

Dirty Energy's Assault On Our Health: Mercury

Dirty Energy’s Assault on our Health is a series of reports examining the numerous threats that power plants pose to our environment and our health. Each segment in the series focuses on a different pollutant emitted by power plants.

Report | Environment New York

Corporate Agribusiness and America's Waterways

Pollution from agribusiness is responsible for some of America’s most intractable water quality problems – including the “dead zones” in the Chesapeake Bay, Gulf of Mexico and Lake Erie, and the pollution of countless streams and lakes with nutrients, bacteria, sediment and pesticides.

Report | Environment New York

National Solar Jobs Census 2010

The National Solar Jobs Census 2010 is the first attempt to quantify the current employment and projected growth of the United State solar industry and is based on a statistically valid sampling of employers throughout the nation.  The rapid increase of solar energy generation has warranted a credible study that examines the size and scope of the industry that until now, has been lacking.

Report | Environment New York

Toxic Chemicals on Tap: How Natural Gas Drilling Threatens Drinking Water

In light of the increased pressure to drill for more natural gas in states across the country, this report focuses on the dangers to drinking water from gas drilling. In particular, we examined hydraulic fracturing (often called “fracking”), a commonly used process gas companies employ to extract natural gas or oil reserves. Natural gas exists in bubbles underground, much like bubbles in carbonated soda. Getting to these pockets of gas requires injecting millions of gallons of water, sand and chemicals into the ground in order to crack open these bubbles in the rock to allow natural gas to flow to the surface.

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