Report | Environment New York

Shining Cities 2018: How Smart Local Policies Are Expanding Solar Power in America

Solar power is expanding rapidly. The United States now has over 53 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity installed – enough to power 10.1 million homes and 26 times as much capacity as was installed at the end of 2010.[1] Hundreds of thousands of Americans have invested in solar energy and millions more are ready to join them.

Report | Environment New York Research and Policy Center

Wind Power to Spare: The Enormous Energy Potential of Atlantic Offshore Wind

The Atlantic coast states are dependent on fossil fuels, which pollute our air, put our health at risk, and contribute to global warming. In response, states in the region are moving toward an energy system powered by clean, renewable sources: Atlantic states now generate enough wind and solar energy to power nearly 2 million homes, 19 times more than just a decade ago.

News Release | Environment New York

New Yorkers featured in project highlighting “Voices for 100% Renewable Energy”

Today, Environment New York announced seven New York residents as leading voices for clean energy.

Report | Environment New York

Making Sense of Energy Storage

America must shift away from fossil fuels and towards clean, renewable sources of energy in order to protect our air, water and land, and to avoid the worst consequences of global warming. Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, are virtually unlimited and produce little to no pollution. With renewable energy technology improving and costs plummeting, it is now possible to imagine a future in which all of America’s energy comes from clean, renewable sources.

The availability of wind and solar power, however, varies by the hour, day and season. To repower our economy with clean energy, we need an electric grid that is capable of incorporating large volumes of variable renewable resources.

Energy storage technologies can be an important part of that electric grid of the future, helping to assure reliable access to electricity while supporting America’s transition to 100 percent renewable energy. To get the most benefit out of energy storage, however, policy-makers and the general public need to understand how energy storage works, where and when it is necessary, and how to structure public policy to support the appropriate introduction of energy storage.

News Release | Environment New York Research and Policy Center

Progress on Energy Storage Can Expedite New York’s Shift to Clean Energy

People have known for decades that virtually unlimited energy resources like solar and wind energy are cleaner and healthier than energy produced by dirty fuels. But, utilities and consumers occasionally express concern about the variability and dependability of those renewable sources. Those concerns are fading with the emergence of game-changing energy storage technologies. According to a new white paper released today by Environment New York, the rapid growth of less expensive wind and solar energy and the plummeting costs of energy storage have led to a six-fold increase in energy storage capacity (excluding pumped hydropower) over the past decade.  

“As renewable energy production rises, energy storage is increasingly becoming a ‘go-to’ option for utilities, businesses and homeowners,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York. "But many people are still unaware that it’s ready for prime time. We need to educate our policymakers about how the smart use of energy storage can make our transition to clean, renewable energy possible.”

News Release | Environment New York

State of the State: Leading the Way on Climate

Today, Governor Andrew Cuomo’s state of the state address discussed a range of pro-environmental initiatives. The Governor's announcement included proposals to: expand the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative; issue solicitations in 2018 and 2019 to develop at least 800 MW of offshore wind projects and foster offshore wind industry; create the zero cost Solar for All Program for 10,000 low-income New Yorkers; as well as directing the Department of Environmental Conservation to adopt regulations to close all coal plants.

Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York, issued the following statement in response:

News Release | Environment New York

Coalition of Business, Labor, Environment & Community Leaders Applaud Governor Cuomo’s Bold Vision to Make NY National Offshore Wind Leader

A large, diverse coalition of business, labor, environmental, grassroots organizations, and elected officials committed to clean energy applauded Governor Andrew Cuomo’s bold and visionary commitments to make New York State the national leader in offshore wind power, announced today as part of New York’s 2018 Clean Energy Jobs and Climate Agenda. Find statements of Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York, and coalition members. 

News Release | Environment New York

NE carbon transportation announcement

A coalition of Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states today announced steps toward limiting dangerous carbon pollution from cars and trucks – the leading contributor to climate change in the region. Over the next year, the states will be gathering input from stakeholders about what an effective policy should accomplish.

The announcement was made at an international conference in Bonn, Germany, where the nations of the world gathered to discuss practical steps needed to implement the Paris Climate Agreement. With the Trump administration’s rejection of the agreement, a coalition of states, cities and businesses – including the states announcing the new transportation initiative today – are carrying the commitment to reduce pollution for the United States as a whole.

Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York issued the following statement in response:

News Release

The College Campus of the Future: Fueled by the 100% Renewable Energy

Today, Environment New York Research and Policy Center, touting the leadership role that colleges and universities must play in the clean energy revolution, unveiled a 10 point plan to guide campuses toward 100 percent renewable energy. Renewable Energy 101: Ten Tools for Moving your Campus to 100% Clean Energy, includes a series of factsheets highlighting 10 key tools to help colleges in New York with building a 100 percent clean, renewable energy system. 

“Colleges and universities across the country are situated to lead the charge in the transition to a 100 percent clean energy future,” said Heather Leibowitz, Director of Environment New York. “Colleges have the ability and the know-how to lead by taking bold steps to shift to clean energy and eliminate pollution from energy use. We hope that the ten point plan laid out in these fact sheets can help.” 

Report | Environment New York

RENEWABLE ENERGY 101:

America has enough renewable energy potential from the sun and wind to power the nation several times over. Studies of the electricity system suggest that high penetrations of renewable energy are possible using technologies available today at costs that society can afford. Technological advances – including the development and commercialization of new methods of energy storage – along with continued declines in the price of renewable energy technologies such as solar power and advances in energy efficiency, suggest that a 100 percent renewable energy system can be achieved by 2050.As hotspots of innovation and technical expertise, college campuses are the perfect place to implement the programs and technologies that will develop the clean energy technologies of tomorrow and accelerate the transition to a future powered entirely by of 100 percent clean, renewable energy.

Environment New York designed a series of 10 fact sheets as a resource for students, faculty and administrators interested in moving their campus toward sustainability. The fact sheets have been crafted to illustrate the importance, challenges and opportunities of 10 important and distinct tools associated with building a 100 percent clean, renewable energy system. Each fact sheet includes two case studies of effective action on college campuses, as well as a list of resources.

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